• Quotes
    Author
  • Those willing to give up a little liberty for a little security deserve neither security nor liberty.
    Benjamin Franklin
  • Things come apart so easily when they have been held together with lies.
    Dorothy Allison
  • With almost every passing day, public access to yet another government information resource is extinguished. Like an exotic species or a nearly forgotten language that suddenly becomes extinct, its disappearance excites little attention or protest. But the cumulative effect of many such losses is bound to be significant.
    From the FAS Project on Government Secrecy, Volume 2005, Issue. No. 19, Feb 22, 2005
  • Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it.
    Henry Ford
  • If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses.’
    Henry Ford
  • A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business.
    Henry Ford
  • You don’t have to hold a position in order to be a leader.
    Henry Ford
  • To do more for the world than the world does for you – that is success.
    Henry Ford
  • Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
    Henry Ford
  • The more that government becomes secret, the less it remains free.
    James Russell Wiggins, newspaper editor, 1956
  • המנהיג שלהם יהיה אחד משלהם;
    השליט שלהם ינבע מביניהם.
    אני אביא אותו קרוב והוא יהיה להתקרב אליי,
    עבור מי הוא מי יהיה להקדיש את עצמו
    להיות קרוב אליי? "
    נאמה ה '.
    Jeremiah 30:21
  • Secrecy, being an instrument of conspiracy, ought never to be the system of regular government.
    Jeremy Bentham
  • We seek a free flow of information...we are not afraid to entrust the American people with unpleasant facts, foreign ideas, alien philosophies, and competitive values.
    John F. Kennedy, February 1962
  • For a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people.
    John F. Kennedy, February 1962
  • Give me the liberty to know, to utter and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.
    John Milton, Areopagitica, 1644
  • Democracies die behind closed doors. The First Amendment, through a free press, protects the peoples right to know that their government acts fairly, lawfully, and accurately.
    Judge Damon Keith, U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals
  • When government begins closing doors, it selectively controls information rightfully belonging to the people.
    Judge Damon Keith, U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals
  • ...those who won our independence believed that public discussion is a political duty; and that this should be a fundamental principle of the American government.
    Justice Brandeis, Whitney vs. California, 1927
  • ...the only effective restraint upon executive policy in the areas of national defense and international affairs may lie in an enlightened citizenry - in an informed and critical public opinion which alone can here protect the values of democratic government.
    Justice Stewart, Pentagon Papers, 1971
  • One of the things that almost never works is secrecy - particularly secrecy in defense of dumbness.
    Newt Gingrich, former speaker of the House, 1996
  • The liberties of people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them.
    Patrick Henry June 5, 1788
  • The only thing new in the world is the history you dont know.
    Pres. Harry Truman
  • Let the people know the facts, and the country will be safe.
    President Abraham Lincoln, 1861
  • We must never forget that the free flow of information is essential to a democratic society.
    President Clinton, veto of Intelligence Re-Authorization Bill, 2000
  • The only sure bulwark of continuing liberty is a government strong enough to protect the interests of its people, and a people strong enough and well informed enough to maintain its sovereign control over its government.
    President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Fireside Chat, 1938
  • Secrecy and a free, democratic government dont mix.
    President Harry Truman
  • Time Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own governors, must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives.
    President James Madison, August 4, 1822
  • A popular government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy; or, perhaps, both.
    President James Madison, August 4, 1822
  • Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right and a desire to know.
    President John Adams
  • The very word secrecy is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and to secret proceedings.
    President John F. Kennedy, 1961
  • ...a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is afraid of its people.
    President John F. Kennedy, 1962
  • When information which properly belongs to the public is systematically withheld by those in power, the people soon become ignorant of their own affairs, distrustful of those who manage them, and - eventually - incapable of determining their own destinies.
    President Richard Nixon, 1972
  • Government ought to be all outside and no inside.
    President Woodrow Wilson
  • Everybody knows that corruption thrives in secret places, and avoids public places, and we believe it a fair presumption that secrecy means impropriety.
    President Woodrow Wilson
  • Press releases tell us when federal agencies do something right, but the Freedom of Information Act lets us know when they do not.
    Senator Patrick Leahy, 1996
  • Secrecy is for losers.
    Senator Patrick Moynihan
  • Secrecy has its place, but governments are always tempted to overuse the secret stamp. When that happens, it can come at the cost of the public's stake in such other values as safety or clean air and water.
    Senators Patrick Leahy and Carl Levin, Restore America's Freedom of Information, 2003
  • The Bush administration has made secrecy, not sunshine, its default position.
    Senators Patrick Leahy and Carl Levin, Restore Americas Freedom of Information, 2003
  • Secrecy has its place, but governments are always tempted to overuse the secret stamp. When that happens, it can come at the cost of the publics stake in such other values as safety or clean air and water.
    Senators Patrick Leahy and Carl Levin, Restore Americas Freedom of Information, 2003
  • Can you imagine what I would do if I could do all I can?
    Sun Tzu
Created by PhpBB3 BBCodes
cron